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                             CHAPTER II
                        Legislative Department
                          (Vidhayee Vibhag)


FUNCTIONS

The  Legislative  Department  is concerned mainly with  the  following
matters:

(i)  Scrutiny of Notes for the Cabinet in relation to all  legislative
proposals from drafting and constitutional points of view;

(ii)   Drafting  of  all   Government  Bills  including   Constitution
(Amendment)  Bills before introduction in Parliament;  translation  of
all  such  Bills into Hindi and forwarding of both English  and  Hindi
versions  of  the  Bills to the Parliament Secretariat;   drafting  of
Government  amendments  to Bills, scrutiny of non-official  amendments
and  rendering of assistance to Administrative Ministries to decide on
the acceptability or otherwise of non-official amendments;

(iii)  Rendering assistance to Parliament and Joint Select or Standing
Committees  of  Parliament at all stages through which a  Bill  passes
before  enactment.   This includes scrutiny of and/or  preparation  of
reports of such Committees, and Hindi Translations of such reports and
minutes of dissent;

(iv) Drafting of Ordinances to be promulgated by the President;

(v)  Drafting  of  legislations to be enacted as President's  Acts  in
respect of States under President's rule;

(vi) Drafting of Regulations to be made by the President;

(vii)  Drafting  of Constitution Orders, i.e.  Orders required  to  be
issued under the Constitution;

(viii)  Scrutiny of all statutory rules, orders and notifications  and
their translation into Hindi;

(ix)  Scrutiny  of  State Legislations in the Concurrent  field  which
requires   assent   of  the  President   under  article  254  of   the
Constitution;

(x)  Scrutiny  of  legislations  to  be  enacted  by  Union  territory
Legislatures;

(xi)  Election  to  Parliament,  Legislatures   of  States  and  Union
territories and Offices of the President and Vice-President;

(xii) Apportionment of expenditure on elections between the Centre and
the State/Union territories with Legislatures;

(xiii) Election Commission, Electoral Reforms;

(xiv)  Publication  of  Central Acts, Ordinances and  Regulations  and
their  authorised translations in Hindi and other languages  specified
in the Eighth Schedule to the Constitution.

2.   During  the period 1998-99 ( i.e.  from 1st April, 1998  to  31st
January,  1999  ),  this Department examined under 131 Notes  for  the
Cabinet involving legislative proposals in consultation with different
Ministries   and   Departments  concerned   for  drafting  Bills   for
introduction  in  the Houses of [Parliament.  Out of the  Bills  which
were pending before Parliament and those introduced during the period,
34 Bills were enacted into Acts during that period.  A list of Acts so
enacted  is  given in Annexure-I.  Some important Acts enacted  during
the period are surveyed below, in Chronological order.


IMPORTANT ENACTMENTS

3.(1)  The Income-tax (Amendment) Act, 1998 (7 of 1998) :   Generally,
the  basis  on  which depreciation is claimed by an  assessee  is  the
written down value of the block of assets.  To enable power generating
units  to depreciate their capital assets in a straight line method at
the  same  rate  at which it is reimbursed by  the  State  Electricity
Boards  under  the  Electricity(Supply) Act, 1948, section 32  of  the
Income-tax  Act  has been amended.  In order to provide incentives  to
mineral  oil,  power,  highway projects and  undertakings  located  in
industrially backward districts of the country, section 80-1A has been
amended  so as to -- (i) extend the benefit of deduction available  to
undertakings commencing production of mineral oil in the North-Eastern
region  to  undertakings located in other parts of country  commencing
commercial  production  of  mineral oil on or after 1st  April,  1997;
(ii)  extend  the  benefit of deduction  available  to  infrastructure
facility  to  housing  and  other  development  activities  which  are
integral  part of a highway project with a condition that the  profits
of  such  housing and other development activities shall  be  ploughed
back to highway projects within a period of three years;  (iii) extend
time  limit for availing the tax holiday from 12 years to 20 years  in
respect  of highway and express-way projects;  (iv) extend the cut-off
date  for  availing the tax benefit by undertakings which generate  or
generate  and  distribute power from 31st March, 1998 to  31st  March,
2000;   and  (v) provide for a five year tax holiday  to  undertakings
located  in  the notified industrially backward districts of  category
'A'  and  a  three  year tax holiday to undertakings  located  in  the
notified  industrially backward districts of category 'B';  subject to
the  condition that such undertakings begin to manufacture or  produce
articles  or things or to operate cold storage plants or plants at any
time  during  the  period from 1.10.1994 to 31.3.1999.   In  both  the
cases,  the  tax  holiday period will be followed by  the  benefit  of
deduction  of 25% of profits (30% in case of companies) for five years
to the eligible undertakings.

For  the  same  purpose, the Income-tax  (Amendment)  Ordinance,  1997
(Ordinance  15  of  1997) was promulgated on the 16th Sept.,  1997  to
achieve  the above purposes.  As the Income-tax (Amendment) Ordinance,
1997  could  not  be  replaced  by an Act of  Parliament  due  to  the
dissolution  of the House of the People, the President promulgated the
Income-tax  (Amendment)  Second Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.  28 of 1997)  on
the  26th  December,  1997.   This   Ordinance  was  replaced  by  the
Income-tax (Amendment) Act, 1998 (7 of 1998).

2.   The Merchant Shipping (Amendment) Act, 1998 (9 of 1998) :  One of
the  objectives  of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1958 is to  foster  and
ensure  efficient  maintenance of Indian Mercantile Marine  sector  to
best  sub-serve  the  nation's interests.  Indian Merchant  Ships  are
required  to  comply with various International Conventions  to  which
India  is  a  party.  I.L.O.  Convention No.   147  stipulates  safety
standards,  including  standards  of competency, hours  of  work,  and
manning  so  as  to ensure safety of life on board ship,  etc.   Since
India  is  a signatory to the said Convention, it became necessary  to
amend  the  Merchant Shipping Act, 1958 to the extent of dealing  with
the  complaints  from  Indian seamen on foreign  vessels  and  foreign
seamen  on foreign vessels in the Indian territorial waters.  The said
I.L.O.   Convention came into force in India w.e.f.  26th Sept., 1997.
As  Parliament  was  not  in session, the  President  promulgated  the
Merchant  Shipping (Amendment) Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.19 of 1997) on the
26th Sept., 1997.  As the Bill to replace the said Ordinance could not
be  introduced in the Rajya Sabha and Lok Sabha had been dissolved  by
the  President on the 4th December, 1997 the President  re-promulgated
the  Merchant Shipping (Amendment) Second Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.  27 of
1997) on the 25th December, 1997 so as to have continuity of Amendment
made in the Merchant Shipping Act.  After Constitution of the 12th Lok
Sabha the Parliament had a short session in February, 1998 and in that
session  as the normal legislative business could not be taken up,  it
became  essential  to again repromulgate the Ordinance for  the  third
time  on  23rd  April, 1998 i.e.  the  Merchant  Shipping  (Amendment)
Ordinance,  1998  (Ord.  7 of 1998) so as to have continued effect  of
the above amendment.

The  Merchant  Shipping  Amendment  Act,   1998  has  been  passed  by
Parliament  which  received the assent of the President on 22nd  June,
1998, replacing the aforesaid Ordinance.

3.   The  Employees'  Provident  Funds  and  Miscellaneous  Provisions
(Amendment) Act, 1998 (10 of 1998) :

The  employees' Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1952
provides  for  the institution of compulsory provident  fund,  pension
fund  and  deposit - linked insurance for the benefit of employees  in
factories  and establishments.  While examining the Demands for Grants
for  the  Ministry of Labour, the Standing Committee of Parliament  on
Labour  and Welfare had made certain suggestions for amendment of  the
Act.   The  Employees'  Provident Funds and  Miscellaneous  Provisions
(Amendment)  Bill, 1997 was introduced in Rajya Sabha, inter-alia,  to
provide for the following :-

(i) to raise the minimum rate of provident fund contribution from 8.33
percent to 10 percent, and the maximum rate from 10 per cent to 12 per
cent  of  the  monthly  wages in order to promote  saving  and  ensure
availability of higher retiral benefits.

(ii)  to  make  a provision that a person who is, or has been,  or  is
qualified  to be a Judge of a High Court or a District Judge shall  be
eligible  for  appointment as the Presiding Officer of  the  Appellate
Tribunal;

(iii) to abolish the provision of three years' infancy period so as to
bring  the factories / establishments within the scope of the Act from
the date of their establishment / registration.

The  Bill was introduced but could not be passed by the Parliament  as
both  Houses  were  not in session.  To achieve the  purposes  of  the
aofresaid  Bill,  the  Employees' Provident  Funds  and  Miscellaneous
Provisions  (Amendment)  Ordinance,  1997  (Ord.    17  of  1997)  was
promulgated  by  the  President  on the  22nd  September,  1997.   The
Eleventh   Lok  Sabha  was  dissolved  on  the  4th  December,   1997.
Therefore,  to  give  continued effect to the Provisions of  the  said
Ordinace,  the Employees' Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions
(Amendment) Second Ordinance (Ord.  25 of 1997) was promulgated by the
President  on  the  25th December, 1997.  As the Bill to  replace  the
aforesaid  Ordinance could not be passed during the 12th Lok Sabha  in
February,  1998, the Ordinance was repromulgated for the third time on
the   23rd  April,  1998,  as   the  Employees'  Provident  Funds  and
Miscellaneous  Provisions  (Amendment)  Ordinance, 1998  (Ord.   8  of
1998).

The  Employees'  Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions (Amendment)  Bill,
1998  has  been replaced by the Parliament and received the assent  of
the President on 23rd June, 1998 replacing the aforesaid Ordinance.

4.   The Payment of Gratuity (Amendment) Act, 1998 (11 of 1998) :  The
Payment  of  Gratuity  Act, 1972 provides for payment of  Gratuity  to
employees engaged in factories, mines, oil fields, plantations, ports,
railway  companies,  shops  and other establishments.  On  receipt  of
representations from Trade Unions, the payment of Gratuity (Amendment)
Bill,  1997  was  introduced in Parliament to enhance  the  amount  of
Gratuity  from  Rs.  one lac to Rs.  two lacs and fifty thousand.   As
the  Bill  could not be passed, the President promulgated on the  24th
September,  1997, the Payment of Gratuity (Amendment) Ordinance,  1997
(Ord.   18 of 1997) to give effect to the provisions of the said Bill.
As  the Eleventh Lok Sabha was dissolved, the President promulgated on
the  25th  December, 1997 the Payment of Gratuity  (Amendment)  Second
Ordinance,  1997  (Ord.  26 of 1997) to give continued effect  to  the
provisions  of the said Ordinance.  As the Bill could not be passed by
the  Parliament  immediately, after the Constitution of the  12th  Lok
Sabha,  the  President  repromulgated  on the 23rd  April,  1998,  the
Payment  of Gratuity (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (Ord.  10 of 1998) to
give continued effect to the provisions of the earlier Ordinance.

The Payment of Gratuity (Amendment) Act, 1998 was passed by Parliament
and  assented  to  by  the President on 22nd  June,  1998.   This  Act
enhances  the amount of Gratuity from Rs.  One Lac to Rs.  Three  Lacs
and  Fifty  Thousand (instead of Rs.  Two Lacs and fifty  thousand  as
provided in the Ordinance ) keeping in view the Fifth Pay Commission's
recommendations  and the consequent increase in the amount of Gratuity
payable to Government employees.

5.   The Representation of People (Amendment) Act, 1998 (12 of 1998) :
Clause  (6)  of Article 324 of the Constitution provides that, on  the
request  of the Election Commission of a State shall make available to
the  Election  Commission  such  staff as may  be  necessary  for  the
discharge of its functions.  Further Section 159 of the Representation
of  People  Act, 1951 provides that every local authority in  a  state
shall  when  so  requested  by  Regional  Commissioner  or  the  Chief
Electoral  Officer  of  the  State, make available  to  any  Returning
Officer  such  staff  as may be necessary for the performance  of  any
duties in connection with an Election.

The  Supreme  Court, in its judgement in Civil Appeal No.6026 of  1993
Election   Commission  of  India  vs.    State  Bank  of  India  Staff
Association,  Patna  and  others and Civil Appeal No.   4611  of  1989
Election  Commission  of India Vs.  Northern Zone Insurance  Employees
Association,  Rajasthan  (AIR  1995 SC 1078) held  that  the  Election
Commission  cannot requsition the services of employees of State  Bank
of  India  and  the Life Insurance Corporation of India  for  election
duties  as  such  employees  are   neither  employes  of  the  Central
Government  nor  of  a State Government nor of a local  authority  and
observed that the persons whose services may be placed at the disposal
of  the  Election Commission must be either employees of  the  Central
Government  or  of the State Government or of a local  authority.   In
view  of  the aforesaid judgement, and to make available the staff  of
statutory  and non-statutory and other educational institutions  aided
by  the Government, and because of the impending General Elections  to
the  12th  Lok Sabha, the President promulgated the Representation  of
People  (Amendment)  Ordinance,  1997  (Ord.23 of 1997)  on  the  23rd
December,  1997  which  provides for requisitioning  of  services  for
election  work  of employees of, apart from local  authorities,  every
university  and  any  other institution, concern or  undertaking  (not
being  an  institution,  concern or undertaking  established  under  a
Central,  Provincial  or State Act or a company within the meaning  of
section 617 of the Companies Act, 1956) controlled, or financed wholly
or  substantially  by funds provided, directly or indirectly,  by  the
Central  Government or a State Government.  The President  promulgated
the Representation of the People (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (Ord.  12
of  1998)  on  the 24th April, 1998 to give continued  effect  to  the
provisions  of  the  aforesaid  1997  - Ordinance  and  to  avoid  any
difficulty  to  the  Election Commission in holding elections  in  the
interregnum.

The  Representation of People (Amendment) Act, 1998 has been passed to
replace  the aforesaid Ordinance of 1998.  The Amendment Act also  has
brought  under  the ambit of section 159 of the Representation of  the
People Act, employees of public sector enterprises, etc.

6.   The  National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and  Research
Act,  1998  (13  of 1998):  The National Institute  of  Pharmaceutical
Education  and  Research  set up as an autonomous body  in  1991,  was
registered as a society under the Societies Registration Act, 1860.  A
Bill to declare the National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and
Research to be an Institution of national importance under Entry 64 of
List  I of the Seventh Schedule to the Constitution and to provide for
its  incorporation  and matters connected therewith was introduced  in
the  Lok Sabha on 3rd March, 1997.  The Bill lapsed on the dissolution
of  the  Eleventh Lok Sabha.  In order to ensure that the  process  of
enrolment  of  students  is  not delayed, the  National  Institute  of
Pharmaceutical  Education and Research Ordinance, 1998 (Ord.2 of 1998)
was  promulgated  on  21st January, 1998 for the purpose.   Since  the
Ordinance was to lapse on the expiry of six weeks after the reassembly
of  Parliament,  that is, on 5th May, 1998, the National Institute  of
Pharmaceutical  Education and Research (Second) Ordinance, 1998  (Ord.
9  of  1998)  was promulgated on 23rd April, 1998  to  give  continued
effect to the provisions of the aforesaid Ordinance.

To  replace  the  aforesaid  Ordinance   the  National  Institute   of
Pharmaceutical  Education  and Research Bill, 1998 was passed  by  the
Parliament  which  received the assent of the President on 26th  June,
1998.

7.   The Electricity Regulatory Commissions Act, 1998 ( 14 of 1998)  :
Power  Sector in India is beset with problems that impede its capacity
to  respond  to the rapidly growing demand for energy.   Although  the
initial  measures  had been taken, serious problems persist,  and  the
reform  becomes  increasingly difficult underscoring the need  to  act
decisively  and  without delay, to focus on fundamental issues  facing
the  power sector, namely, lack of rational retail tarrifs, high level
of  cross-subsidies, poor planning and operation, inadequate capacity,
neglect of consumers, limited involvement of private sector skills and
resources  and  the  absence of an independent  regulatory  authority.
Considering  the  paramount  importance of  re-structuring  the  power
sector,  two conferences of Chief Ministers were organised to  discuss
the  whole gamut of issues in the power sector.  A Common Minimum Plan
for  Power  (CMNEP)  was  adopted in  these  conferences.   The  CMNEP
recognised that the gap between demand and supply of power is widening
and  acknowledged  that  the financial position of  State  Electricity
Boards  is  fast  deteriorating and future development  in  the  power
sector cannot be sustained without viable State Electricity Boards and
improvement  of  their operational performance.  The CMNEP  identified
creation  of  Regulatory  Commission as a step in this  direction  and
specifically  provides  for  establishment   of  Central   Electricity
Regulatory   Commission  (CERC)  and   State  Electricity   Regulatory
Commissions  (SERCs).   The  Administrative Staff  College  of  India,
Hyderabad was assigned the task of studying the restructuring needs of
the  regulatory  system  and the report of the  ASCI  recommended  the
creation  of  independent Electricity Regulatory Commissions, both  at
the Centre and the States.

To  give  effect  to the above proposals, the  Electricity  Regulatory
Commission  Bill,  1997  was introduced in Lok Sabha on  14th  August,
1997.   This  Bill  could  not be passed due  to  dissolution  of  the
Eleventh  Lok  Sabha,  which  resulted in delay  in  establishing  the
Regulatory  Commission leading to confusion and misgivings in  various
sections   about   Government's   commitment  to   the   reforms   and
restructuring  of  the  power sector.  Therefore,  it  was  considered
necessary  to  ensure  the  speedy  establishment  of  the  Regulatory
Commission  and  as  Parliament  was not  in  session,  the  President
promulgated  the  Electricity Regulatory Commissions  Ordinance,  1998
(Ord.  14 of 1998) on 25th day of April, 1998.

The salient features of the said Ordinance were as follows :

(a)  it  provides  for  the establishment  of  a  Central  Electricity
Regulatory  Commission  at  the Central level  and  State  Electricity
Commissions at the State levels.

(b) the main functions of CERC are :

(i) to regulate the tariff of generating companies owned or controlled
by the Central Government;

(ii)to  regulate  inter-State  transmission including  tariff  of  the
transmission utilities;

(iii)to regulate inter-State sale of power;

(iv)  to  aid and advise the Central Government in the  formulated  of
tariff policy.

(c) the main functions of the SERC, to start with shall be:

(i) to determine the tariff for electricity, wholesale, bulk, grid and
retail;

(ii)to  determine  the  tariff  payable for use  of  the  transmission
facilities;

(iii)to  regulate  power  purchase  and  procurement  process  of  the
transmission utilities, etc.

(iv)  subsequently, as and when each State Government notifies,  other
regulatory functions could also be assigned to SERCs.

(d)  it  also  aims  at improving the financial health  of  the  State
Electricity  Boards  (SEBs)  which are losing heavily  on  account  of
irrational  tariffs  and  lack  of budgetary support  from  the  State
Governments,  as a result of which, the SEBs have become incapable  of
even  proper maintenance, leave alone purposive investment.   Further,
the  lack  of  creditworthiness  of  SEBs  has  been  a  deterrent  in
attracting  investment  both  from  the public  and  private  sectors.
Hence,  it is made mandatory for State Commissions to fix tariff in  a
manner  that  none  of the consumers or class of  consumers  shall  be
charged  less  than fifty per cent of the average cost of supply.   It
enables  the  State  Governments to exercise the option  of  providing
subsidies  to weaker sections on condition that the State  Governments
through  a subsidy, compensate the SEBs.  As regards the  agricultural
sector,  it  provides  that  if  the  State  Commission  considers  it
necessary, it may allow the consumers in the agricultural sector to be
charged  less than fifty per cent for a maximum period of three  years
from  the date of commencement of the Ordinance.  It also empowers the
State  Government  to  reduce the tariff further but in that  case  it
shall  compensate  the SEBs or its successor utility,  the  difference
between  the  tariff  fixed  by the State Commission  and  the  tariff
proposed  by the State Governments by providing budgetary allocations.
Therefore,  it  enables  the State Governments to fix any  tariff  for
agriculture  and  other  sectors provided it gives  subsidy  to  State
Electricity Boards to meet the loss.

To   replace  the  aforesaid   Ordinance  the  Electricity  Regulatory
Commission  Act, 1998 was passed by the Parliament, which received the
assent of the President on the 2nd July, 1998.

8.   The Finance (Amendment) Act, 1998 (16 of 1998) :  Consequent upon
the  finalisation  of  the  decision on  the  Fifth  Pay  Commission's
recommendations,  a  review of the expenditure budget for 1997-98  was
undertaken.   The review revealed that post budget commitments as well
as  Pay Commission's award added up to a total expenditure beyond  the
budget  estimates.   A number of proposals for additional  expenditure
were  also  pending  consideration.  These  developments  indicated  a
slippage  in the fiscal deficit, which could send negative signals  to
the financial market, impact on interest and inflow of investment.  To
mop  up  additional  resources,  raising of special  duty  of  customs
leviable  under section 68 of the Finance (No.2) Act, 1996 from 2  per
cent to 5 per cent, ad valorem on imported goods (Other than petroleum
products  and  project  imports), and raising of  foreign  travel  tax
leviable  under  section  35 of the Finance Act, 1979  in  respect  of
journeys  undertaken tonon-neighbouring countries from Rs.  300 to Rs.
750  per  passenger  were decided.  Since the Parliament  was  not  in
session,  the  Finance Acts (Amendment) Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.   16  of
1997) was promulgated on the 16th September, 1997 for the purpose.

The  said  Ordinance  could not be replaced by a Bill  in  the  Winter
Session  of  Parliament  in  1997.  To give continued  effect  to  the
provisions  of  the  said Ordinance, the  Finance  (Second  Amendment)
Ordinance,  1997 (Ord.  24 of 1997) was promulgated on 24th  December,
1997  with  the modification that the foreign travel tax for  journeys
undertaken  to  non-neighbouring countries be charged at the  rate  of
Rs.500  per  passenger in place of Rs.  750 per passenger with  effect
from 1st January, 1998.

The  said  Ordinance also could not be replaced by a Bill  during  the
first  session  of the Twelfth Lok Sabha.  Therefore, further to  give
continued  effect  to  the  said proposals,  the  Finance  (Amendment)
Ordinance,  1998 (Ord.  5 of 1998) was promulgated by the President on
21st  April,  1998.   To replace the aforesaid  Ordinance,  Parliament
passed  the Finance (Amendment) Bill, 1998, which received the  assent
of the President on 7th July, 1998.

9.   The Lotteries (Regulation) Act, 1998 (17 of 1998) :  The  conduct
of  certain types of lottery in the country, the malpractices  thereof
and  their  impact  on poorer sections of the society had  been  under
scrutiny  of  the Government.  The continued prevalence of,  popularly
known,  single digit and instant lotteries and the temptation  offered
by  them  proved to be the undoing of many families.  In spite of  the
guidelines  issued  by the Central Government as also  the  guidelines
issued  bythe Hon'ble Supreme Court, the evil could not be  eliminated
and  a  need to regulate the conduct of lotteries through the  Central
Legislation  became necessary to protect the interests of the gullible
poor.   Considering the exigencies of the matter and as the Parliament
was  not in session, the Lotteries (Regulation) Ordinance, 1997  (Ord.
20 of 1997) was promulgated by the President on 1st October, 1997.  In
order  to  give  continued  effect  to  the  provisions  of  the  said
Ordinance, the Lotteries (Regulation) Second Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.  31
of  1997) was promulgated by the President on 30th December, 1997.  As
the  Lotteries (Regulation) Second Ordinance, 1997 (Ord.  31 of  1997)
was going to lapse on the 5th May, 1998, the President promulgated, on
23rd  April, 1998 the Lotteries (Regulation) Ordinance, 1998 (Ord.   6
of 1998).

The Lotteries (Regulation) Act, 1998 replacing the aforesaid Ordinance
was  passed  by  the Parliament.  The Act provides,  inter  alia,  for
conditions subject to which lotteries may be organised, such as prizes
not  to be offered on pre-announced number or on the basis of a single
digit,  State Governments to print lottery tickets bearing the imprint
and logo of the State, the State Government to sell the tickets either
itself  or  through  the  distributors or selling  agents,  the  State
Governments  to conduct the draws of all the lotteries, place of  draw
to  be located within the State, lotteries not have more than one draw
in  a  week,  number  of bumper draws not to be more  than  six  in  a
calender  year  etc.  The Act also provides that the State  Government
may,  within the State, prohibit that the State Government may, within
the  State, prohibit the sale of lottery tickets of another State  and
the  Central  Government  may  prohibit   the  lottery  organised   in
contravention of the conditions, etc.  The offences under the Act have
been made cognizable and non-bailable.

10.   The High Court and Supreme Court Judges (Conditions of  Service)
Amendment  Act, 1998 ( 18 of 1998) :  The Fifth Central Pay Commission
recommended  the revision in the salaries and other allowances of  the
Central  Government  employees  including  the members  of  All  India
Services.    The  Government  has  accepted   the  majority   of   the
recommendations.   The  notification  dated the 30th  September,  1997
amending  the  pay rules of the Central Government employees,  namely,
the  Central  Civil Services (Revised Pay) Rules, 1997, has also  been
issued.   The revised pay rules are deemed to have come into force  on
the 1st day of January, 1996.

Having  considered all the aspects of the matter, a necessity was felt
to  increase  the  salaries  of the Judges with effect  from  the  1st
January, 1996 as detailed below :-

Chief  Justice  of India Rs.  33,000 per month Judges of  the  Supreme
Court  Rs.  30,000 per month Chief Justice of a High Court Rs.  30,000
per month Judges of High Court Rs.  26,000 per month

Since the Parliament was not in session, the President promulgated the
High  Court and Supreme Court Judges (Conditions of Service) Amendment
Ordinance,  1998 (Ord.  11 of 1998) on the 24th day of April, 1998  to
give effec to the increase in the salaries of the Judges.

The  High  Court and the Supreme Court Judges (Conditions of  service)
Amendment Act, 1998 replaced the said Ordinance.

11.   The  Electricity Laws (Amendment) Act, 1998 (22 of 1998):   This
Act  provides  for transmission as a distinct activity independent  of
generation and distribution under Indian Electricity Act, 1910 and the
Electricity  (Supply) Act, 1948 and to empower the Central  Government
or the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission to grant transmission
licence  in  this case of inter-state transmission of energy  and  the
state Government or the State Electricity Regulatory Commission in the
case of intra-state transmission of energy in the area of transmission
to be specified in the license.

12.   The  Interest on Delayed Payments to Small Scale and  Ancilliary
Industrial  Undertakings  (Amendment) Act, 1998 ( 23 of 1998 ) :   The
Interest  on Delayed Payments to Small Scale and Ancilliary Industrial
Undertakings  Act, 1993 regulates the procedure of payment of interest
on  delayed  payments  to  small scale  and  ancilliary  undertakings.
Though  the  Act has been inoperation for a period of five years,  the
problem  of  delays in payment of outstanding dues to the small  scale
industrial  units  continues  unabated.  There  have  been  widespread
discussions  on  the provisions of the Act among the various  interest
groups  including  the Departments of State Governments  dealing  with
industries,  banks  and  small  industry  associations.   The  general
consensus  emerged from such discussions is that certain amendments to
the  Act are necessary in order to make it more effective so that  the
aims and objectives of the Act are achieved.

The  existing  Act was not applicable to the Central or  State  Public
Sector  Undertakings , such as, National Small Industries  Corporation
(NSIC) and the State Small Industries Development Corporation (SSIDC).
Since both the aforesaid Corporations have been playing important role
in  marketing  of  SSI  products,   this  Act  amends  the  definition
of"Supplier"  so  as  to  bring  within the  scope  :   the  aforesaid
Corporations.

Section  3  of  the Act stipulates that a buyer is  required  to  make
payment  on or before the agreed date to small scale supplier of goods
or  services.   Where  the  credit  period is  not  specified  in  the
Agreement,  the payment is to be made within 30 days from the date  of
the  acceptance of goods or services.  It has been noticed that buyers
tend  to prescribe a credit period of 240-360 days.  This defeats  the
purpose of the Act.  It also amends Section 3 of the Act by specifying
a period of 120 days as the maximum period of credit.

Section  4  of  the  Act states that Buyers shall  be  liable  to  pay
interest  to the supplier on outstanding dues beyong the appointed day
at  a rate which is 5% points above the floor rate.  The Reserve  Bank
of  India in its credit policy, has changed the system of  prescribing
floor  rates  for  the  purpose  of lending by  Banks  for  the  loans
exceeding  Rs.   2  Lakhs.  The Banks are now free to  fix  the  Prime
Lending  RAte  for  Loans.   The change in Interest  Rate  Policy  has
necessitated a change in determining the panel rate of interest in the
Act.   This Act has also fixed the penal rate of interest at one and a
half times of the Prime Lending Rate of the State Bank of India.

Under  Section 6 of the Act, the outstanding amount together with  the
interest  is recoverable (in case of dispute) by way of a civil  suit.
This Act also further provides an alternative mechanism of arbitration
and  conciliation  apart from Section 6 to resolve the disputes  under
the  Act.  For this purpose, State Governments have been authorised to
set  up one or more "industry faciliation councils" for the purpose of
arbitration and conciliation.  These councils shall act as Arbitrators
or conciliation for sectt.  disputes between SSI suppliers and buyers.
This  aims  of  facilitating resolution of disputes  between  the  two
parties amicably.

13.  The Beedi Workers Welfare Cess (Amendment) Act, 1998 (24 of 1998)
:  The Beedi Workers Welfare Cess Act, 1976 (56 of 1976) and the Beedi
Workers  Welfare  Funds  Act, 1976 (62 of 1976) have been  enacted  to
ameliorate the living conditions and provide welfare measures to Beedi
workers.   The former Act provides for levy as a duty of excise by way
of  cess on manufactures beedis at a rate of not less than 10 paisa or
more  than 50 paisa per thousand.  The proceeds are being utilised  to
finance  the Welfare Funds for Beedi Workers.  Initially, the case was
fixed  at 25 paisa per kilogram of tobacco issued from warehouses  for
manufacture  of  beedis.   The Cess for financing  the  Beedi  Workers
Welfare  Fund  could not be collected under the Beedi Workers  Welfare
Cess Act, 1956 w.e.f.  1st March, 1979 due to exemption granted by the
Finance Act, 1979-80.  Thereafter, the Beedi Workers Welfare Cess Act,
1976 was amended in 1981 to provide levy of not less than 10 paisa and
not more than 50 paisa per thousand manufactured beedis.

After  Amendment of the Beedi Workers Welfare Cess Act, 1976 the  Cess
was  levied at the rate of 10 paisa per thousand manufactured  beedis,
but  was  increased to 30 paisa per thousand.  On 1st March,  1987  to
meet the increasing cost of administering the various welfare measures
under  the  Fund.   It  was subsequently increased  to  50  paisa  per
thousand  manufacture beedis w.e.f.  17th October, 1995.  In order  to
continue  and  expand welfare measures for persons employed  in  beedi
establishments,  the Beedi Workers Welfare Cess Act, 1976 has  further
been  amended  so as to increase the minimum rate from 10 paisa to  50
paisa  and maximum rate of cess from 50 paisa to 5 rupees per thousand
manufactured  beedis, as the Central Government may,from time to time,
fix.


14.   The President's Emoluments and Pension (Amendment) Act, 1998 (25
of  1998) :  Section 1A of thePresident's Emoluments and Pension  Act,
1951  provides  that  there  shall  be paid to  President  by  way  of
emoluments  20,000 rupees per mensum.  Sub Section (1) of Section 2 of
the  Act  provides  for  pension of 1,20,000/-  rupees  p.a.   to  the
retiring Presidents.

2.   The Emoluments and Pension of the President were last enhanced in
1990.   Consequent  upon the revision of the slary and  allownaces  of
various  consftritutional functionaries, it is considered necessary to
enhance  the  emoluments  of  President and pension  to  the  retiring
Presidents.   In  view  of this the emoluments of President  has  been
enhanced  from  rupees  twenty  thousand per mensem  to  rupees  fifty
thousand  per mensem and pension from rupees one lakh twenty  thousand
per annum to rupees three lakhs per annum.

As  the Vice-President's Pension Act, 1997 has been enacted to provide
for  payment of pension and other pensionary benefits to such  persons
who  have  held  the  ofrfice  of  the  Vice-President  of  India  and
subsequently   becoes  entitled  to   pension  under  the  President's
Emoluments  and  Pension Act, 1951 may not be  extended.   Thereafter,
such  a restriction under the President's Emoluments and Pension  Act,
1951 has also been imposed.


(15) The Salaries and Allowances of Officers of Parliament (Amendment)
Act,  1998  (26  of  1998):  Consequent upon the  enhancement  in  the
President's  Emoluments  and  Pension  Act, 1951, and  in  the  salary
allowances  and pension of Members of Parliament the total  emoluments
of  the Chairman of the Council of States have also been raised to Rs.
40.000/-  per  month with effect from the 1st January, 1996  which  is
considered  to be a reasonable level between the emoluments payable to
the Governor of a State.

(16)  The Governors (Emoluments, Allowances and Privileges)  Amendment
Act,  1998  :   (27  of  1998) :  Clause (3) of  Article  158  of  the
Constitution  provides  that the Governors shall be entitled  to  such
emoluments,  allownaces  and  privileges  as   may  be  determined  by
Parliament  by  lay, and until a provision in that behalf is so  made,
they  will  receive such emoluments, allowances and privileges as  are
specified  under the Second Schedule to the Constitution.   Parliament
has enacted the Governors (Emoluments, Allowances and Privileges) Act,
1982 to provide for the emoluments, allowances and other privileges to
governors  and section 3 thereof prescribes Rs.  11,000 per mensum  as
emoluments  thereof.   The above amendments were made  effective  from
1stApril, 1986.

Consequent  upon  the  revision of salary and  allowances  of  various
constitutinal  authorities, it was considered necessary to enhance the
emoluments of the Governors of the State.  There has been considerable
price  rise  since  1986  and the emoluments  and  allowances  of  the
Governors  have not been enhanced since then.  It was, therefore, felt
appropriate  to  enhance their emoluments which were last  revised  in
1986  and  thus  the emoluments of the Governors was raised  from  Rs.
11,000 per mensum to Rs.  36,000 per mensum w.e.f.  1st January, 1996.


17.   The  Salary,  Allowances and Pension of  Members  of  Parliament
(Amendment)  Act,  1998  :  (28 of 1998) :   The  Joint  Parliamentary
Committee  and  the  Joint  Committee on Salaries  and  Allowances  of
Members of Parliament have made several recommendations for increasing
the  salary, allowances and other facilities to Members of  Parliament
and  pension to the former Members of Parliament.  On the basis of the
recommendation,  it was proposed inter-alia to increase the salary  of
Members  of Parliament from Rs.  1500 to Rs.  4000 per month, to raise
the daily allowances from Rs.  200 to Rs.  400, to increase the number
of  single air journeys from 28 to 32 in a year with a provision  that
unutilised  air  journey  of  an  year will be  carried  over  to  the
following  year  to increase in road-mileage from Rs.  5 to 6 per  km.
allowing  road  mileage  to a Member of Parliament, if he  travels  by
road,  between  the  place connected by Rail to increase  the  minimum
pension  from  Rs.   1,400 to Rs.  2,500 per month,  to  increase  the
additional  pension from 250 to Rs.  500 for each year exceeding  five
years of service as such members, to increase in pension to the spouse
or  a  dependent  of Member of Parliament from Rs.  500 p.m.   to  Rs.
1000  p.m.  in case such Member dies in harness.  It was also proposed
to  increase  the  amount  of  Car Advance from  Rs.   50,000  to  Rs.
1,00,000 and allow the spouse of the Member to travel free in all rail
journeys  in  air  conditioned first class or executive class  in  all
trains from usual place of residence to Delhi and back against present
to and fro air-conditioned two-tier rail travel facilities once during
each session.

18.   Oilfields  (Regulation and Development) Act, 1948 (29 of 1998  :
Sub  Section  (4)  of  Section 6 A of  the  Oilfields  Regulation  and
Development  Act,  1948 empowers the Central Government to  amend  the
Schedule  to the said Act, by notification, so as to enhance or reduce
the  rate at which royalty shall be payable in respect of any  mineral
oil,  subject to the condition that the rate of royalty in respect  of
any  mineral  oil shall not be fixed so as to exceed twenty per  cent.
of  the sale price of any mineral oil shall not be enhanced more  than
once during any period of three years.

With  a  view to encourage exploration of oil and natural gas  in  the
country,  the Government approved the New Exploration Licensing Policy
(NELP) providing, inter alia, for the following:

(i)  royalty rates for crude oil shall be at the rate of 12.5% for the
onland  areas and 10% for offshore areas, calculated with reference to
international process.

(ii)  royalty  may  be  reduced or exepted with a  view  to  encourage
exploration  in  deep water areas and frontier areas.  To begin  with,
royalty  will  be  charged at half the prevailing rate  for  off-shore
areas  beyond 400 meter bathymetry for the first seven years after the
commencement of commercial production.

Thus,  for the acreages to be offered under the NELP, royalty would be
payable  at  different rates depending upon the location of the  area,
water  depth etc.  The present scheme of the Oilfields (Regulation and
Development)  Act,  1948 however, does not permit laying down of  more
than one rate of royalty in respect of any mineral oil, as required to
operationalise  the  NELP.  It was, therefore, necessary to amend  the
Oilfields  (Regulation  and Development) Act, 1948  for  incorporating
suitable  provisions in Section 6A of the Said Act for conferring upon
the  Central  Government  the powers to notify the  rates  of  royalty
approved under the New Exploration Licencing Policy.

The  Government  also  decided to dismantle the  Administered  Pricing
Mechanism  (APM)  in  respect of indigenous crude  oil  and  petroleum
products in a phased manner commencing from the 1st April, 1998.  With
this,  the price of indigenous crude oil which was earlier fixed on  a
cost  plus  formula  once  in  three years  has  been  linked  to  the
international  FOB  price of crudes imported into the country.   Under
the  new  pricing scheme, the price of indigenous crude oil would  now
vary  on monthly basis.  This necessitated some changes in the Act  to
make it possible to vary the rate of royalty on crude oil at intervals
shorter than 3 years as presently provided for in the Act.

To meet the above requirements, it was proposed to amend the Section A
of the Act so as to :

(i)  confer upon the Central Government the powers to notify more than
one  rate of royalty in respect of the same mineral oil produced  from
different classes of leased areas;

(ii) empower the Central Government to grant partial or full exemption
from the payment of royalty in respect of offshore areas, and

(iii)  make  consequential  amendments in section 10 of  the  Act  for
laying the notifications before Parliament.

The Act seeks to achieve the above objects.

19.  The Export-Import Bank of India (Amendment) Act, 1998 (1 of 1999)
:   Sub-section  (1) of section 4 of the Export-Import Bank  of  India
Act,  1981 provides that the authorised capital of the Exim Bank shall
be  200  crores  of  Rupees  and   the  Central  Government,  may   by
notification,  increase  the said capital upto 500 crores  of  Rupees.
The  paid  up capital of the Exim Bank has been augmented out  of  the
budgetary  allocation  and in the year 1995-96 it reached the  maximum
limit of Rs.  500 crores of rupees.

2.  It became necessary to provide for an adequate capital base to the
Exim  Bank  to  support its future business growth,  to  maintain  its
creditworthiness  with  international lenders, to enable it  to  raise
external  commercial  borrowings  at competitive rates  for  financing
needs  of Indian exporters, and to retain adequate resource flows  for
maintaining  flexibility.   Accordingly, it was proposed to raise  the
authorised  capital  of the Exim Bank from 500 crores of Rs.  to  1000
crores  of rupees and enhance the maximum limit upto which the Central
Government  may  increase  the said capital, by  notification  in  the
official  gazette, from 500 crores of rupees to 2000 crores of  rupees
it  was, therefore, necessary to amend sub-section (1) of Section 4 of
the Export-Import Bank of India Act.


(20)  The Cotton Ginning and Pressing Factories (Repeal) Act, 1998  (2
of 1999):  The Cotton Ginning and Presing FActories Act, 1925, enacted
on  the  8th  day of August, 1925, provides for periodical  filing  of
returns;   maintenance of registers;  marking of bales and other  rule
making;   powers  for both the Central and State Governments  for  the
purpose of regulating the ginning and pressing factories.

There  have  been changes in the pattern of processing, marketing  and
consumption  of cotton since the enactment of the Act.  In the  makret
driven  economy needing quality products modernisation of ginning andk
pressing   factoriesw  is  essential.   In  the  present   liberalised
industrial  scenario the restrictions laid down in the Cotton  Ginning
and  Pressing Factories Act, 1925 are not required any longer and  the
Cotton Control Order, 1986 issued under the Essential Commodities Act,
1955  would cover provisions considered essential to regulate  working
of  ginning and pressing factories in future so long as Cotton remains
as  an essetial commodity.  Hence it was considered that the said  Act
should be repealed.

The   repeal  will  also  provide  a  thrust  and  incentive  to   the
modernisation  efforts  in the cotton ginning and pressing  sector  to
ensure quality processing of cotton and chargin remunerative price for
the service provided for.

This Act has been enacted to achieve the aforesaid objects.


21.   The High Denomination Bank Notes (Demonetisation) Amendment Act,
1998 (3 of 1999) :  To eliminate the shortage of currency notes and to
ease  the  pressure on other denominations, it was proposed  to  amend
section  2  of the High Denomination Bank Notes (Demonetisation)  Act,
1978.   This will facilitate the Reserve Bank of India to issue  notes
of Rs.  1,000 denomination immediately.

22.   The Railway Claims Tribunal (Amendment) Act, 1998 (4 of 1999)  :
Section  9 of the Railway Claims Tribunal Act, 1997 provides that  the
salaries and allowances payable to, and the other terms and conditions
of service (including pension, gratuity and other retirement benefits)
of  the Chairman, Vice Chairman and other members shall be  prescribed
by rules.  Accordingly, the Central Govt.  notified the Railway Claims
Tribunal  (Salaries  and  Allowances  and  conditions  of  service  of
Chairman, Vice Chairman and Members) Rules, 1989.  Whiel examining the
question  of  revising  the  salary  and  allowances  payable  to  the
Chairman,  Vice  Chairman  and  other Members of  the  Railway  Claims
Tribunal  w.e.f.  1.1.1996 on the basis of the recommendations of  the
Vth Central Pay Commission by suitably amending the relevant rules, it
was  observed  that there is no enabling provision in the said Act  to
give  retrospective  operation  as provided under Section 36A  of  the
Administrative  Tribunal  Act,  1985.   In   order  to  overcome  this
difficulty,  the  said  Act  was amended to provide  for  an  enabling
provision to make rules with retrospective effect not earlier than the
date of commencement of the said Act.

23.   The Leaders and Chief Whips of Recognised Parties and Groups  in
Parliament (Facilities) Act, 1998 :  ( 5 of 1999 ) :  The Eleventh All
India  Whips  Conference held at Bangalore in January, 1994  made  the
following recommendations :-

Chief   Whips  of  recognised  opposition   parties  and   the   state
legislatures  should be provided secretarial assistance and facilities
of  telephone and office accommodation in the premises of legislatures
by giving them statutory recognition (secretarial assistance means one
stenographer grade 'B' and one peon).

The  Twelfth All India Whips Conference held at Srinagar on 21 and  22
August,  1997 further deliberated the issue relating to the facilities
to be extended to Whips.

The smooth functioning of the Parliamentary system depends, to a large
extent,  on the efficiency of the party machinery in the legislatures.
The  Chief  Whips and Leaders of Parties and Groups in Parliament  are
important  party  functionaries  who play a vital role in  the  proper
functioning  of the parties and groups in the legislatures and  hence,
fulfil an important public purpose.

After  due consideration of the matter as a whole and to implement the
recommendation  of  the All India Whips Conference, this Act has  been
enacted  to  provide  for sercretial and telephone facilities  to  the
Leaders and Chief Whips of recognised parties and recognised groups in
Parliament.

24.   The High Court and Supreme Court Judges (Salaries and Conditions
of  Service) Amendment Act, 1998 ( 7 of 1999 ) :  When officer of  the
State  Judicial  Service is appointed as a Judge of a High Court,  his
leave account is regulated under the provisions of sub-clause (iii) of
clause  (a)  of sub-section (2) of section 4 of the High Court  Judges
(Salaries  and Conditions of Service) Act, 1954, (hereinafter referred
to as the "High Court Judges Act").  Under the aforesaid provisions, a
Judge is entitled to carry forward only the leave earned to the extent
of  240 days.  He is, however, not entitled to carry forward the  Half
Pay   Leave   in   his  leave   account  in  the   Judicial   Service.
Representations have been received from certain Judges, requesting for
aprovision  in  the High Court Judges Act to enable them to avail  the
benefit  of carry forward of Half Pay Leave.  In view thereof, it  was
proposed to make a suitable amendment to the High Court Judges Act, to
provide  for  the same.  Similarly, the Registry of the Supreme  Court
has  requested for deleting the restrictions of 240 days for the carry
forward  of  leave on full allowances when a Judge of a High Court  is
elevated  to the Supreme Court.  It was also proposed to accede to the
request  and  the  restriction  of 240  days  provided  under  section
4(2)(a)(iii)  of the Supreme Court Judges (Salaries and Conditions  of
Service)  Act, 1958 (hereinafter referred to as "Supreme Court  Judges
Act") be done away with.

A  High  Court  Judge  or a Supreme Court Judge  is  entitled  without
payment  of rent to the use of official residence.  Where a Judge does
not avail himself of the use of such residence, he is paid every month
an allowance i.e.  Rs.  2,500/- p.m.  in the case of a Judge of a High
Court  and  Rs.   3,000/- in the case of a Judge of a  Supreme  Court.
Although  there has been steep increase in the market rent of  houses,
the allowances payable to the Judges in lieu of official residence has
remained  static  since 1986.  This Act as a serious disincentive  for
Judges  to  occupy their own houses and accept the facility  of  House
Rent  Allowance  (HRA).   Accordingly,  it  was  further  proposed  to
increase  HRA to Rs.  10,000/- p.m.  in respect of the High Court  and
Supreme Court Judges.

The  rates of pension of the Judges of the High Courts and the Supreme
Court  were  last enhanced w.e.f.  the 1st November, 1986 by the  High
Court  and Supreme Court Judges (Conditions of Service) Amendment Act,
1986.   The  Vth  Central Pay Commission recommended revision  in  the
pensionary  benefit  of  the Central Govt.   employees  including  the
Members  of  the All India Services.  The revised pension  rules  have
come  into  force on the first day of January, 1996.  In view  of  the
foregoing,  a  necessity was felt to increase the pension,  additional
pension  and  maximum pension of the Judges of the High Court and  the
Supreme Court suitably.

In  the  case of a Judge who has been elevated from the Bar,  existing
provision  provides  for computation of death-cum-retirement  gratuity
amounting to 20 days' salary for each completed year of service unlike
on half-yearly basis applicable to in the case of a Central Government
employee.   It was proposed to grant ten days' salary as gratuity  for
each complete4d one-half year of service.

It  was  also decided to remove the ceiling of Rs.  8000 per annum  as
special additional pension in compliance with the order dated the 20th
January,  1991 of the Supreme Court of India in the matter of  Justice
M.L.  Jain Vs.  Union of India.

This  Act,  therefore,  amended the High Court  Judges  (Salaries  and
Conditions  of  Service)  Act,  1954  and  the  Supreme  Court  Judges
(Salaries  and  Conditions of Service) Act, 1958 to achieve the  above
objectives.

(25)  The  Customs (Amendment) Act, 1998 (8 of 1999):  Section 75A  of
the  Customs  Act, 1962, which was inserted by the Finance  Act,  1995
provides  that where any drawback payable to a claimant under  section
74  or  section 75 of the Customs Act as the case may be, is not  paid
within  a  period of three months from the date of filing of claim  to
the  date  of  payment of such drawback, there shall be  paid  to  the
claimant  in  addition to the amount of drawback interest fixed  under
section 27A of the said Act from the date after the expiry of the said
period of three months till the date of payment of such drawback.

With a view to arrest the declining trend in exports, several measures
were  announced by the Government in the recent past to give a special
package  of  measures  for  boosting exports.   One  of  the  measures
includes a commitment on the part of the Government to pay interest to
exporters if Government dues by way of duty drawback is delayed beyond
two  months.   Thus, with a view to reduce the time-limit  from  three
months  to  two months as given under section 75A of the Act,  it  was
necessary to amend that section.  The reduced time-limit of two months
instead  of  the  present three months will expedite  the  process  of
payment  of drawback, and, thereby emphasise the urgency of delivering
export  related  benefits  to the exporters within  shortest  possible
time.

Simultaneously,  it was proposed to empower the Central Government  to
levy  interest  where  the  claimant   has  been  sanctioned  drawback
erroneously, if such drawback is no refunded by him within a period of
two months, instead of the present three months.

The  amendments  will expedite the process of payment of drawback  and
realization of revenue.

This Act seeks to achieve the above objects.

(26)  The Income-tax (Second Amendment) Act, 1998 (11 of 1999):   This
Act  amends the Income-tax Act, 1961.  The amendments made in the said
Act  are intended to extend and clarify certain fiscal incentives  and
to remove some anomalies in certain sections of the Income-tax Act.

Section  2  amends clause (23G) of section 10 of the  Income-tax  Act.
This  clause was amended by the Finance (No.  2) Act, 1998 to provide,
inter alia, that the exemption under this clause shall be available in
respect  of the investments made on or after the 1st day of June, 1998
only  in  an  enterprise which is wholly engaged in  the  business  of
developing,  maintaining and operating an infrastructure facility  and
which  has  been  approved by the Central  Government.   However,  the
amended provision generated apprehension among the tax payers that the
benefit  would not be available to investments made prior to 1.6.1998.
The amendment seeks to clarify that the exemption available under said
clause  (23G) of Section 10 in respect of income from investment  made
before  the 1st day of June, 1998 shall continue to be governed by the
provisions  of  the  said clause as it stood  immediately  before  its
amendment by the Finance (No.  2) Act, 1998.

Section  3  amends  section  10A of the  Income-tax  Act.   Under  the
existing  provisions,  tax holiday is available, to newly  established
industrial  undertakings set up in free trade zones and, to units  set
up  in  software technology parks for five years out of the  block  of
initial  eight  years,  subject to fulfilment of  certain  conditions.
This  amendment  extends the period of tax holiday from five years  to
ten  years  in  order  to give added thrust  to  exports.   Section  4
similarly extends the five year tax holiday period to ten years to the
export-oriented units under section 10B of the Income-tax Act.

Section  5  amends section 32 of the Income-tax Act.  With a  view  to
remove  sluggishness  in  commercial  vehicles  sector,  the  proposed
amendment  seeks  to provide that depreciation on commercial  vehicles
acquired  by the assessee on or after the 1st day of October, 1998 but
before the 1st day of April, 1999 and put to use before the 1st day of
April,  1999  for the purposes of business, shall be allowed  at  full
percentage  prescribed for such assests, irrespective of the period of
user of the assets during the relevant year.

Sections  6  and 7 amend sections 44AD and 44AE of the Income-tax  Act
respectively.   These sections provide a presumptive basis to bring to
tax  the  profits  and  gains arising from  certain  business.   These
sections  allowed option to the assessees to declare a lower profit to
tax  than the profits determined on presumptive basis, subject to  the
condition  that  evidence  in support of the profits so  declared  was
furnished  by  the  assessee  and thereupon the  assessment  would  be
completed by scrutiny under section 143(3) of the Act.  This option to
declare  the lower profit was withdrawn by the Finance Act, 1997  with
effect  from 1.4.1997.  With a view to harmonize these provisions with
sections  44AA  and 44Ab which provide for compulsory maintenance  and
audit  thereof  in  such  cases   with  effect  from  1.4.1998,  these
amendments  extend  the  benefit of option for offering  lower  profit
under these sections for the assessment year 1997-98.

Section  8  amends  section  80P of the  Income-tax  Act.   Under  the
existing  provision, profits derived by a co-operative society engaged
in  the  marketing  of agricultural produce of its members  are  fully
deductible   in   computing   the   taxable   income   under   section
80P(2)(a)(iii)  of the Income-tax Act.  The deduction was intended for
primary  co-operative societies marketing the agricultural produce  of
their  farmer  members.   In  the case  of  Kerala  State  Cooperative
Marketing  Federation  Vs.   Commissioner of Income-tax,  the  Hon'ble
Supreme  Court  held  that the use of words "of its  members"  in  the
relevant  clause would mean the agricultural produce belonging to  the
members  and  not necessarily grown by them.  Interpretation given  to
the  use  of the words in the provision is not in accordance with  the
legislative  intent  of the existing provision.  In respect of  income
arising  from transactions with non-members, the co-operatives are not
different from other assessees, and such co-operatives are required to
be taxed in the same manner as companies or other assessees engaged in
marketing  of  agricultural  produce.   If  an  amendment  in  section
80P(2)(a)(iii)  was not made.  The amendment, therefore, replaces  the
words  "of  its  members" by the words "grown by  its  members".   The
amendment  restricts  the  deduction  to  the  profits  derived  by  a
cooperative  society engaged in the marketing of agricultural  produce
grown by its members.


CENTRAL ORDINANCES, 1998-99

1.   The  National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and  Research
(Second) Ordinance, 1998 (9 of 1998).

2.  The Payment of Gratuity (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (10 of 1998).

3.   The  High Court and Supreme Court Judges (Conditions of  Service)
Amendment Ordinance, 1998 (11 of 1998).

4.   The Representation of the People (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998  (12
of 1998).

5.   The  Essential  Commodities (Amendment) Ordinance,  1998  (13  of
1998).

6.   The  Electricity  Regulatory Commission Ordinance,  1998  (14  of
1998).

7.  The Central Vigilance Commission Ordinance, 1998 (15 of 1998).

8.   The Prasar Bharati (Broadcasting Corporation of India)  Amendment
Ordinance, 1998 (16 of 1998).

9.   The  Oilfields (Regulation and Development) Amendment  Ordinance,
1998 (17 of 1998).

10.   The Central Vigilance Commission (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (18
of 1998)

11.  The Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (19 of 1998).

12.  The Finance (No.2) Amendment Ordinance, 1998 (20 of 1998).

13.  The Companies (Amendment) Ordinance, 1999 (1 of 1999).

14.   The Prasar Bharti (Broadcasting Corporation of India)  Amendment
Ordinance, 1999 (2 of 1999).

15.  The Patents (Amendment) Ordinance, 1999 ( 3 of 1999 ).

16.  The Central Vigilance Commission Ordinance Act, 1999 ( 4 of 1999)

17.   The Urban Land (Ceiling & Regulation) Repeal Ordinance, 1999  (5
of 1999)

18.   The  Salary,  Allowances and Pension of  Members  of  Parliament
(Amendment) Ordinance, 1999 ( 6 of 1999 ) :


SUBORDINATE LEGISLATION

During  the period under review (1998), the number of statutory rules,
orders and notification vetted by this Department was 2355.

CONCURRENT FIELD LEGISLATION

6.   (1)  The work relating to processing of legislative proposals  in
respect of the following subject in the concurrent fields (list III of
the  Seventh Schedule to the Constitution) has been allocated to  this
Department  under  the  Government of India (Allocation  of  Business)
Rules, 1961:-

(a)   Marriage  and  Divorce,infants   and  minors,  adoption,  wills,
intestacy and succession, joint family and partition.

(b)  Transfer  of  property, other than agricultural  land  (excluding
benami transactions), registration of deeds and documents

(c) Contracts, but not including those relating agricultural land.

(d) Actionable wrongs.

(e) Bankruptcy and insolvency,

(f) Trusts and Trustees :  Administrator General and Official Trustees

(g) Evidence and Oaths

(h) Civil procedure including limitation and arbitration and

(i) Charitable and religious endorsements and religious institutions.


2.   Legislative proposals relating to the above subjects sponsored by
the  State Governments and which by virtue of the provisions of Clause
(2)  of  Article  254  of  the  Constitution  require  assent  of  the
President,  also scrutinised by this Department.  During the  calender
year,  1998,  85 references relating to State Bills / Ordinances  were
dealt with.


TRAINING IN LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT :

7  (i)  The  Training  facilities  in  the  Legislative  Drafting  are
available  under  the  Commonwealth Fund  for  Technical  Co-operation
(CFTC)  which  offers such training facilities, on regional basis,  to
the countries in the Asian / African regions.  The training courses in
the  Legislative  Drafting  were  introduced under  the  CFTC  on  the
recommendation  of the Conference of Law Ministers of the Commonwealth
Countries  held  in  United Kingdom in 1973.  The CFTC  programme  for
training  of legislative drafting has been in existence since 1974 and
has conducted courses so far in different state capitals including New
Delhi, Colombo, Harare, Dhaka and Barbados.

INSTITUTE OF LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING AND RESEARCH :

(ii) With a view to increasing the availability of trained legislative
drafts  persons in the country, the Institute of Legislative  Drafting
and  Research was established as a Wing of the Legislative Department,
Ministry  of Law and Justice in January, 1989.  The Institute has been
imparting  theoritical  as well as practical training  in  Legislative
Drafting under four separate courses namely:

(a)  Basic  Course  in Legislative Drafting of 6 months  duration  for
officers of the State Governments / Union Territory Administrations.

(b)  Advance Course of 3 months duration for the senior level officers
of the State Government / Union Territory Administrations.

(c)  Referesher  course  of  short  duration (in  the  nature  of  the
workshop)  for the senior level officers of State Governments /  Union
Territory Administration.

(d) Appreciation Course of two weeks' duration for the Officers of the
various Central Government Ministries / Departments.

The  Institute  also arranges awareness programmes for the benefit  of
law students of various universities visiting it.

TENTH BASIC COURSE IN LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING :

(iii)  During the year, the Tenth Basic Course in Legislative Drafting
was  organised for a period of six months ( i.e.  from April, 1998  to
September, 1998 ) for the benefit of the officers deputed by the State
Government, Union Territory Administrations.  An officer each from the
States  of  Haryana, Kerala and Madhya Pradesh and two  officers  each
from  the  States of Meghalaya, Nagaland, Sikkim and one officer  from
the  Official  Languages  Wing  of   this  Department  (totalling  ten
officers) successfully completed the Course.


EIGHTH APPRECIATION COURSE


(iv)  The Eighth Appreciation Course meant for the Central  Government
Officers  of  the level of Deputy Secretary, Under Secretary and  Desk
Officers/Section  Officers was organised from the 9th November,  1998.
As  regulations  under  various statutes are framed by  the  statutory
bodies,  the  training  was also extended to the  officers  of  Public
Sector    Undertakings/Subordinate     offricers      under    various
Ministries/Departments  of Government of India so as to enable them to
learn  drafting of such legislations.  Eleven officers from  different
Ministries/Departments  and one from a Public Sector Undertakings took
part in the training programme.


AWARENESS PROGRAMME

(v)  The institute arranged awarness programme in Legislative Drafting
for  the  benefit  of law students from University  of  Burdwan  (West
Bengal) who visited the institute in September, 1998.



IMPARTING  OF  PRACTICAL  TRAINING TO FOREIGN TRAINEES  OF  BUREAU  OF
PARLIAMENTARY STUDIES AND TRAINING

(vi)  The  Bureau  of Parliamentary Studies and  Training,  Lok  Sabha
Secretariat  organises every year an international training  programme
in  Legislative  Drafting  of about two and half months  duration  for
various  foreign  parliamentary/Government Officials and Officials  of
Parliament  and State Legislature Secretariats of India with a view to
equipping  them with the basic concept skills and tecniques,  required
for  drafting  of  legislation  so   that  they  can  render  valuable
assistance  to the Legislators when called upon to do so.  As part  of
the  said training programme the institute of legislative Drafting and
Research  has  been  giving  on  the job  practical  training  in  the
Legislative  Drafting  on an attachment basis.  This year, the  Bureau
has  ten  trainee  officers  of foreign countries  and  one  from  the
Parliament  Secretariat  and one from State  Legislature  Secretariat.
The Institute has given on the job practical training to them from the
4th January, 1999 to 15th January, 1999.


COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN THE FIELD OF LEGISLATION, ETC.  - INDIA CODE ON
INTERNET AND NICNET.

(vii)  In  house training programme in computer operations,  has  been
conducted  for  the  benefit of officers / staff  of  the  legislative
department for enabling them to progressively use the computer systems
in  their  office work.  All the Ordinances, Presidential  Regulations
and  the Government Bills have been processed with the facilities  now
available on Computers.

India   Code  consists  of  unrepealed   Central  Acts  of   all-india
application.   The entire India Code has been made available on NICNET
and  INTERNET.   The  Department  is  acclimatising  itself  with  the
retrieval programme developed by the National Informatics Centre (NIC)
Planning  Commission  (having  data  base  of  the  statute  book  and
retrieval  of  Acts of Parliament for use in Legislature drafting  and
updating  the Acts of Parliament by carrying out their amendments.  To
have  accurate text of the entire data realting to India Code,  action
is  at hand in updating them in consultation with the Govt.  The  said
retrieval  system alongwith Homepage which is being updated from  time
to time is accessible on NICNET and INTERNET.

ISSUES RELATING TO ELECTION LAWS :

(i) Use of Electronic Voting Machines - The Electronic Voting Machines
were used in 16 constituencies spread in the Union Territory of States
and States of Madhya pradesh and Rajasthan during General Elections to
the  Legislative Assemblies held on 25-11-1998.  The Constituencies in
the  state of Madhya Pradesh where the Electronic Voting Machines were
used  were 15 Gwalior, 16 Lashkar East, 17 - Lashkar West, 239  Bhopal
South  and  240  Bhopal  North.   In   the  State  of  Rajasthan,  the
constituencies where the Electroning Voting Machines were used were 41
-  Hazwamahal, 42 - Johri Bazar, 43 - Kishanpol, 95 - Ajmer East  (SC)
and  96 - Ajmer (West) and in Delhi Sarojini Nagar, Gole Market, Minto
Road,  Kasturba  Nagar,  Jangpura and Delhi Cantonment area  were  the
constituencies  where  the Electronic Voting Machines were used.   The
performance  of the E.V.M.  was found to be satisfactory and dhere use
was greatly appreciated by the public.


(ii)  Proxy voting for the Members of the Armed Forces - The  Election
Laws  (Amendment) Bill, 1998 was introduced in Lok Sabha on 22.12.1998
to  provide  that  the Members of the Armed  Forces  and  Paramilitary
forces would have an additional option to vote by proxy.  Earlier they
had  the option to either vote in person or through the postal ballot.
The  Election  Commission of India keeping in view the fact that  with
the  enactment  of the Representation of the People  (Amendment)  Act,
1996,  the minimum campaign period has been reduced from 20 days to 14
days  and  keeping  in  view  the  logistic  constraints  involved  in
despatching  postal  ballots  to Members of the Armed  Forces  through
their  Record  Officers and receiving those ballot papers back  before
counting  process  commences,  recommended that the  Member  of  Armed
Forces  in  order to ensure their full participation in the  electoral
exercise,  may be allowed to vote by proxy, instead of postal  ballot.
The  Government,  accordingly,  decided to provide an  option  to  the
Members  of  the Armed Forces of the Union and of forces to which  the
provisions  of  the Army Act, 1950 has been made  applicable,  whether
with or without modifications, to vote either in person or through the
system of postal ballot or through the system of proxy, at an election
in the manner to be specified in the rules.



RESERVATION  OF  SEATS  FOR WOMEN IN THE HOUSE OF THE  PEOPLE  AN  YHE
LEGISSLATIVE ASSEMBLIES OF THE STATES

(iii)  The  Constitution  (Eighty-fourth  Amendment)  Bill,  1998  was
introduced  in  Lok  Sabha  on 14.12.1998  to  provide  for  one-third
reservation  of  seats  for  women  in  Lok  Sabha  anndd  Legislative
Assemblies of the States.



ELECTORAL REFORMS

(iv)  The  Representation  of  the People (Amendment)  Act,  1998  was
enacted   to  provide  that,  apart   from  local   authorities,   any
innstitution,  concern  of  undertaking  established  by  or  under  a
Central, Provincial or State Act, any company as efined in section 617
of  the Companies ACt, 1956 or any institution, concern or undertaking
which  iss  controlled or financed wholly or ssubssantially  by  funds
provided,  directly  or  indirectly , by the Central Government  or  a
State  Government,  shall  make  available their  staff  for  election
duties.  The Act replaced the Representation of the People (Amendment)
Ordinance,  1997  (Ord.   23 of 1997) which was  repromulgate  as  the
Representation  of the People (Amendment) Ordinance, 1998 (Ord.  12 of
1998).

In  addition,  Government  held a meeting with political  partiess  on
22.5.1998  to  discuss  various  proposalss on  electoral  reform  and
consequent  upon  a decision taken in that meeting, an 8  Member  High
Powered  Committee  under  the Chairmanship of  Shri  Indrajit  Gupta,
Member of Parliament, was constituted to:-

(a)  examine the pattern of State Funding in other countries where  it
is  in vogue an suggest concrete proposals for providing State Funding
to candidates set up by recognized political parties;

(b)  examine,  in  detail,  the following related  proposals  an  make
suitable recommendations:

(i) maintainance of accounts by political parties;

(ii) ban on donation by companies to political parties;

(iii)  inclusion  of  expenses of political parties  in  the  election
expenses  of  candidates for purpose of ceiling on election  expenses;
and

(iv)  empowering of the Election Commission of India to fix ceiling on
election expenses before every General Election.


The Committee consisted of the following members:-

(1) Shri Indrajit Gupta, M.P.  (Chairman) (2) Shri Somnath Chatterjee,
M.P.(Member)  (3)  Dr.   Manmohan Singh, M.P.(Member)  (4)  Shri  V.K.
Malhotra,  M.P.(Member)  (5) Shri Madhukar Sarpotar, M.P.(Member)  (6)
Shri R.  Muthiah, M.P.  (Member) (7) Shri Digvijay Singh, M.P.(Member)
(8) Prof.  Ram Gopal Yadav, M.P.  (Member).

The  Committee has submitted its recommenationss to the Government  on
14th  January,  1999.   It has, inter alia,  suggested  partial  State
funding  of  elections,  in  kind, to the candidates  set  up  by  the
recognised political parties.

Pursuant  to  another  decisionnn taken in the  aforesaid  meeting  of
political parties, Governnment has writtenn to the Election Commission
of  India  to  review and reformulate, the Model Code of  Conduct,  so
reformulated  could  be  considered for giving statutory  effect.   In
addition,  the Election Commission of India has also been requested to
review  its  order relating to Reservation and Allotment of Symbol  in
consultation with political parties.


SHARING OF ELECTION EXPENDITURE WITH STATE/UNION TERRITORY GOVERNMENT

9.The  entire expenditure on elections is initially met by Governments
of  the  concerned States and Union Territories (  with  Legislatures)
from  the  respective  Consolidated Funds.  The share of  the  Central
Government in the expenditure is apportioned by Accountant Generals in
accordance with principles mutually agreed upon between the Centre and
the  State  Government/Union territory Administrations.  According  to
these  principles,  the  expenditure on preparation  and  printing  of
electoral  rolls,  election  establishment and  election  material  of
common  concern and Photo Identity Cards is shared equally between the
Government   of  India  and   the  State  Government/Union   territory
Administrations.   The expenditure on the conduct of elections is also
shared  equally if the elections are held simultaneously to the  House
of  the  People  and  Legislative Assemblies of the  States  or  Union
territories.   The entire expenditure is borne by the Govt.  of  India
in  respect of election to the House of the People and by the State  /
Union  Territory  Administrations  in  respect   of  election  to  the
legislative  assemblies.   The entire expenditure in respect of  Union
Territories  having  no legislature is borne by the Govt.   of  India.
Similarly, the entire expenditure on the conduct of elections to Rajya
Sabha  and to offices of the President and the Vice-President is  also
borne by the Government of India.


MODIFIED EDITIONS OF STATUTES

10  (i) The Department brings out from time to time, modified editions
of   Central  Acts  and  some   other  important   publications   like
Constitution  of India,Manual of Election Law, Orders issued under the
Constitution of India, etc.  All the Central Laws up to the year, 1958
have  been  compiled for bringing out in the form of Bharat Sanhita  (
Revised  edition  of  India Code) in diglot form.   The  Statement  of
objects  and  Reasons appended to the principal bills have  also  been
added  at the end of each Act included in the revised edition of India
Code.

L.......I........T.......T.......T.......T.......T.......T.......T...J
        (ii).   Volumes  I,  II, IV, V, XI, XIII, XV  of  the  revised
edition  of  India  Code have been published.  Volumes III,  VI,  VII,
VIII,  IX,  X,  XII XIV, XVI, XVII, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI and  XXII  are
under Print.

        (iii).  The Annual Volume of Central Acts in Book form for the
year  1995-96 have been printed and Annual Volume for the year 1997 is
under Print.

        (iv) The Constitution of India (pocker size) is under print.

        (v)  The  Manual of Election Law (revised edition)  in  diglot
form has been printed.

        (vi)  Seven  Modified editions of the Central Acts  have  been
published  and six modified editions are under print during the period
under - report.



        PUBLICATION OF SUBORDINATE LEGISLATION UNDER VARIOUS ACTS

        14.   Pursuant  to  the recommendations of  the  Parliamentary
Committee  on  Subordinate  Legislation,  a  scheme  for   maintaining
Subordinate  Legislation  up-to-date  and making  the  same  available
expeditiously  to  the  public had been  formulated.   As  Subordinate
Legislation under an enactment is issued by the Ministry or Department
which  is  administratively  concerned  under  the  said  scheme,  the
Administrative  Ministries are required to maintain folders containing
up-to-date  copies  of all rules, orders and notifications  issued  by
them.  The Legislative Department, while preparing the revised edition
of  any  Central  Act, also independently compiles, on  the  basis  of
material  available  with it, an manuscript of booklet containing  all
the  Subordinate  Legislation  under  Act and sends the  same  to  the
Administrative  Ministry  concerned with the Act.  The  Administrative
Ministry  has  to  scrutinise the manuscript, finalise it and  get  it
published.   While  the revised edition of an Act is published by  the
Legislative  Department, the Subordinate Legislation under the Act  is
published by the Administrative Ministry.

        Compilation  of Subordinate Legislation under one Act has been
published  by the Administrative Ministry as companion volumes to  the
Acts   published  by  the   Legislative  Department.   Manuscripts  of
Subordinate  legislation  under  26 Acts are at an advanced  stage  of
printing.   Manuscripts  of Subordinate Legislation under 05 Acts  are
under preparation in this Department, list of these are at ANNEXURE II


        MAINTENANCE OF CENTRAL AND STATE CODES, ETC.

        12.   Correction Section of this Department is responsible for
maintenance  and up-dating of the Central Legislations, such as, India
Code, Central Acts ( not included in the India Code ), Constitution of
India, Manual of Election Law, General Statutory Rules and Orders, and
for  maintaining  the Central Ordinances, Regulation, President's  Act
and State Acts.  The section maintains Master Copies of the India Code
which,  inter alia, contains unrepealed Central Acts for reference  in
the  Ministry  of  Law and Justice ( Department of Legal  Affairs  and
Legislative  Department) and by the Ministers and other Legal Officers
of the Government of India.  These are valuable references books.

        EDITING OF MANUSCRIPTS OF BILLS, ORDINANCES, ETC.

        13.   The editing of manuscripts and checking proofs of Bills,
Ordinances,  Regulations, President's Bills, Adaptation Orders, Orders
issued  under  the  Constitution of India.   Delimitation  of  Council
Constituencies  Orders is done by the Printing Sections.  Bills  which
are  required  to  be introduced in a short time are also  printed  on
behalf  of the House of the People or the Council of States.   Editing
and proof-checking of the publications like the Constitution of India.
Manual  of Election Law, Revised edition of India Code, Annual  Volume
of  Central Acts.  Modified editions of Central Acts, Annual  Reports,
etc.,  are  also  done  in these sections.  These  sections  are  also
responsible    for    the     publication      of    Central     Acts,
Ordinances,Regulations,  President's  Acts,  etc., in the  Gazette  of
India and their subsequent reprints as publication for sale.

        OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

        14.    The  Official  Language   Section  of  the  Legislative
Department  is concerned with the overall aspects of work relating  to
official  language in the official work.  This includes policy as also
programme.   This Section processes proposals to secure authentication
by  the president of the translation of Central Acts in Hindi as  well
as  regional  languages  before publication in the  Official  Gazette.
Approval  for  Hindi translation is required under Section 5(1)(a)  of
the  Official  Languages  Act, 1963 and for regional  languages  under
section  2(a)  of the Authoritative Texts ( Central Laws)  Act,  1973.
During  the period from 1.4.1998 to 30.11.1998, the section  processed
in all 34 Central Acts in Hindi and 58 in regional languages.

        The  Legislative  Department  has been  declared  as  notified
office  on  29.4.1979 under rule 10(4) of the Official Languages  (Use
for Official Purposes of the Union) Rule, 1976.


        OFFICIAL LANGUAGES WING :


        15.    Background   and  Functions:    During   the   national
independence movement it was felt that only political freedom will not
be  sufficient  to  prove  to the world that  we  are  an  independent
Nation/State.   An  independent Nation / State is one which  does  not
have  to  depend upon other languages (or the language of the  foreign
rulers)  to manage its affairs.  Keeping this in mind the  Constituent
Assembly  adopted Hindi in Devanagari script as the Official  Language
of  the country on the 14th September, 1949.  With the enforcement  of
the  Constitution  on  26th January, 1950, Hindi became  the  Official
Language  of  the  Union  of India according to  Article  343  of  the
Constitution.   On the recommendations of the Committee of  Parliament
on Official Language, the President issued an order to the Ministry of
Law  to constitute a Standing Commission legal experts.  In  pursuance
of  the  directive  issued by the President,  the  Official  Languages
(Legislative) Commission was constituted in the year 1961.

        Later  on, the Government decided to departmentalise this work
and put it on a permanent footing.  With this objective the Commission
was abolished and the Official Languages Wing was created as a part of
the  Legislative  Department.  All those functions which were  earlier
assigned  to  the  Commission  have been  entrusted  to  the  Official
Languages  Wing  besides  some other functions.  This  was  done  with
effect from the 1st October, 1976.


        The  principal  functions assigned to the  Official  Languages
Wing of the Legislative Department are :

        (i)  to  prepare and publish a standard legal terminology  for
use, as far as possible, in all official languages;

        (ii)  to  prepare authoritative texts in Hindi of all  Central
Acts and Ordinances and Regulations promulgated by the President;

        (iii)  to  prepare authoritative texts in Hindi of all  rules,
regulations  and  orders  made  by the Central  Government  under  any
Central  Act  or  any  Ordinance or  Regulations  promulgated  by  the
President;

        (iv)  to  prepare authoritative texts of all Central Acts  and
Ordinances  and  Regulations  promulgated  by  the  president  in  the
respective  Official  Language  of the States and to arrange  for  the
translation of all Acts passed and Ordinances promulgated in any State
into  Hindi, if the texts of such Acts or Ordinances are in a language
other than Hindi;  and

        (v)  to perform such other duties as may be assigned to it  by
the Government of India from time to time.

        Subsequently following functions have also been added:-

        (1)  Translation  in  Hindi  of deeds,  legal  documents  like
contracts, agreements, leasses, bonds, mortgages, etc;,

        (2)  Translation  into  Hindi of all  statutory  Notifications
under section 3(3) of the Official Languages Act, 1963;

        (3)  Translation  into  Hindi  of Statutory  Rules  issued  by
Government  of  Non-Hindi  speaking  states   for  being  laid  before
Parliamennt when such states are under presidential rule.

        (4)   Translation   into   Hindi   of   all   the   Parliament
questions/answers,  assurances etc.  relating to the Ministry of  Law,
Justice and Company Affairs.

        (5) Training in Legislative Drafting in Hindi to officers from
Hindi speaking states;

        (6)  Work relating to Coordinating Committee of Hindi speaking
states for ensuring effective coordination in the evolution of uniform
legal  phraseology  and  model  of   standard  clauses  in  Hindi  and
publication thereof;

        (7)  Work relating to Hindi Salahkar Samiti of the Ministry of
Law,  Justice  &  Company  Affairs   and  providing  Grants-in-Aid  to
Voluntary  Organisations  for promotion of Official languages  in  the
field of law.

        (8)  Publication  of  diglot editions of  Central  Acts  (with
legislative history) and popularisation thereof.

        (9) Preparation and maintenance of India Code in Hindi (Bharat
Sanhita) and also in diglot form.

        (10)  Publication  of  regional   languages  versions  of  the
Constitution of India and arranging functions for the release thereof.


        LEGAL GLOSSARY

        The  work  of developing and publishing 'Legal Glossary' is  a
continuous  process.   Since  the inception of  Official  Languages  (
Legislative)  Commission in 1961, five editions of Legal Glossary have
been  brought  out  and every successive edition was larger  in  size.
While  the  first edition (1970) contained 20,000 entries,  the  fifth
edition  (1992) of Legal Glossary contained 61,000 entries spread over
in  seven  parts.   The  Legal Glossary brought out  by  the  Official
Languages  Wing has received wide acclaim by discerning men of law and
letters.   Work  on  bringing out another enlarged  edition  of  legal
glossary has already been started.


        CONSTITUTION OF INDIA

        The  diglot  edition  of the Constitution of India  was  first
published  in  1988.  The second edition of the same was published  in
1990.   The  third  edition of the Constitution of India  was  brought
up-to-date  in  1991.   A supplement to the Constitution of  India  in
diglot  form  had  also  been  brought  out  in  1994  containing  the
Constitution  (Sixty-ninth  Amendment)  Act,   1991  to   Constitution
(Seventy-fifth  Amendment) Act, 1993.  In 1996, another edition of the
diglot  version was brought out incorporating all the amendments up to
and  inclusive  of  the Constitution (Seventy-eighth  Amendment)  Act,
1995.  A separate edition of the Constitution of India in A-4 size has
already  been published and pocket size of the same is in the  process
of printing.


        BHARAT SANHITA

        All the Central Laws have been compiled and brought out in the
form  of India Code in handy-volumes.  The last edition of India  Code
consisting of eight volumes was published in 1959.  Action has already
been  initiated  for bringing out Bharat Sanhita (Revised  edition  of
India Code) in diglot form.  This will consist of about 60 volumes and
will  contain  Hindi and English versions of Central Acts  of  general
importance  in  chronological order.  One of the salient  features  of
these codes will be that the Statement of objects and reasons appended
to  the  principal  Bill has also been added at the end  of  each  Act
included in the revised edition of India Code.

        Volumes I, II, IV and V, XI, XII and XV of the revised edition
of  India Code have already been published by Official Languages Wing.
Volumes  III, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XII, XIV, XVI, XVIII, XIX, XX  are
at the different stages of printing.


        PREPARATION  AND PUBLICATION OF AUTHORITATIVE TEXTS OF CENTRAL
ACTS

        As mentioned earlier, the task of publication of authoritative
texts  of  Central Acts in Hindi developed on the  Official  Languages
Wing.   During the period under report, 49 Acts have been published in
the  Official  Gazette  as authoritative texts thereof  in  the  Hindi
Language  under  section 5(1)(a) of the Official Languages  Act,  1963
(Annexure), total number of such Acts have gone up to 1765.



        PREPARATION  AND  PUBLICATION  OF  AUTHORISED  TRANSLATION  OF
PRESIDENT'S ACTS, ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS:

        The  Hindi versions of 27 Ordinances, 7 Notes for the  Cabinet
consisting of 394 pages were also prepared by this Wing.

        CONSTITUTION ORDERS:

        The  Hindi version of all the Constitution orders, which  were
issued during the said period, have also been prepared by this Wing.

        PUBLICATION OF DIGLOT EDITIONS OF CENTRAL ACTS:

        Central  Acts,  for  which  there is a  likelihood  of  public
demand,  are published by the Official Languages Wing in diglot  form.
During the year 1998, four such acts have been printer so far.  Out of
these, one Act has been printed for the first time and three acts have
been printed twice and even more.


        AUTHORISED HINDI TRANSLATION OF BILLS:

        Sub-Section  (2)  of section 5 of the Official Languages  Act,
1963  which was brought into force on 1st October, 1976, required that
all Bills to be introduced or amendments thereto to be moved in either
House  of Parliament shall be accompanied by a translation of the same
in  Hindi.   During the period under review, the Hindi version  of  71
Bills comprising 1751 pages were supplied to the Houses of Parliament.

        GENERAL STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS (G.S.R.O) :

        Sub-section  (3)  of  section  3  of  the  Official  Languages
Act,1963  is a very important provision.  It lays down the  foundation
for  bilingual working of the Central Government.  Under clause (i) of
that   sub-section,   all   resolutions,    general   orders,   rules,
notifications,  etc., issued or made by the Central Government must be
in  both  Hindi  and  English.  The Official  Languages  Wing  of  the
Legislative  Department has been entrusted with the job of preparation
of  such  statutory rules and orders, etc., in Hindi for  simultaneous
publication  in  the  Official  Gazette.   It may  be  noted  that  no
notification  can  be  published in the Gazette of  India  in  English
alone.   It  has  to be published in English and Hindi  and  that  too
simultaneously.   During the period under report, the number of  pages
of such rules, notifications, etc..  were 8051.

        PREPARATION  AND PUBLICATION OF AUTHORITATIVE TEXTS OF  RULES,
REGULATIONS, ORDERS, ETC.  :

        Clause  (b)  of sub-section (1) of section 5 of  the  Official
Languages  Act  requires that a translation in Hindi, published  under
the  authority of the President in the Official Gazette of any  order,
rule, regulation or bye-law issued under the Constitution or under any
Central  Act  shall be deemed to be the authoritative text thereof  in
Hindi.   Upto  31st  December, 1998, the Official Languages  Wing  has
prepared the translation of 802 such rules, regulations, orders, etc.,
in  Hindi.   Out of them, the authoritative texts of 798 rules,  etc.,
have been finalised and published in the Official Gazette.


        PREPARATION  AND  PUBLICATION  OF SUBORDINATE  LEGISLATION  IN
DIGLOT FORM:

        Pursuant to the recommendation of the Committee on Subordinate
Legislation,  a scheme for preparation of Subordinate Legislation  and
making  the  same available to the public has been formulated  by  the
Government.  A subordinate legislation under an enactment is issued by
the  Ministry or Department, which is administratively concerned,  the
official  Language  Wing prepares and sends the Hindi version of  such
subordinate  legislation  which  is  required  by  the  Administrative
Ministries  or Departments for publication in diglot form.  Some  such
compilations  of  subordinate legislation have been published  by  the
Administrative  Ministries or Departments as companion volumes to  the
Act  e.g.,  the  Income-tax Manual, Wealth-tax  Manual,  the  Gift-tax
Manual,  the  Estate  Duty  Manual, the Companies  (  Profits)  Surtax
Manual,  Compilation  of  Fundamental Rules and  Supplementary  Rules,
Compilation  of Railway Services ( Pension) Rules, Compilation of Rail
Road Tariff Rules, etc.

        The  Official  Languages  Wing, while  preparing  the  revised
edition  of  the  Central Acts, which are of public  importance,  also
independently  compiles  on  the  material   available  with  it,  the
manuscript  of  diglot  edition  of  the  Act  containing  subordinate
legislation under that Act.  The few names of such Acts are:

        (1)   The  Official  Languages  Act,   1963,  (2)  The   Dowry
Prohibition  Act,  1961,  (3) The presidential  and  Vice-Presidential
Elections  Act,  1952,  (4) The Food Adulteration Act, 1954,  (5)  The
Citizenship Act, 1955.

        MAINTENANCE OF CENTRAL CODES, ETC.:

        The   Correction  Section  of   the  Official  Languages  Wing
maintaining 18 sets of India Code as well as Bharat Sanhita.  Besides,
it  also  keeps  other important manuals up-to-date for  reference  by
officers  in this Wing.  Apart from this, this section also  maintains
different  parts  of  the Central Gazette for ready  reference.   This
Section  has also prepared uptodate Hindi version of volumes, XX, XXI,
XXII  of  India  Code  for publication in diglot form.   The  work  of
preparing  Hindi  manuscript of Volume XXIII of India Code  in  diglot
form is at hand.

        In addition, this Section ---

        (a)  also supplied up-to-date copies of about 89 Central  Acts
to  various  State Governments for translation into  various  Regional
Languages;

        (b)  has also distributed the Gazette copies of Hindi versions
of  9  Central Acts to Hindi speaking states for publication in  their
state Gazettes.


        EDITING  OF  MANUSCRIPTS  OF BILLS, ACTS,  ORDINANCES,  DIGLOT
EDITIONS, ETC., AND PUBLICATION THEREOF:

        The  Printing  Section  of  the  Official  Languages  Wing  is
primarily  concerned  with the editing of manuscripts and checking  of
proofs  of  Bills,  Ordinances, Regulations, President's  Acts,  etc.,
issued  under  the  Constitution  of India,  Delimitation  of  Council
Constituencies Orders, etc., Bills which are required to be introduced
in  a short time are also printed on behalf of the House of the people
or  the  Council  of  States.    Editing  and  proof-checking  of  the
publications  in diglot form of the Constitution of India.  Manual  of
Election  Law, Revised edition of India Code, modified diglot  edition
of Central Acts, statutory rules and orders, Annual Reports, etc., are
also  done in this section.  This section is also responsible for  the
printing  and  publication of Central Acts,  Ordinances,  Regulations,
President's  Acts, etc., and their subsequent reprints in diglot  form
as   publication   for  sale.   This   section   discarged   all   its
responsibilties during the year under review.

        In addition to the aforesaid work, the Printing Section of the
Official  Languages  Wing  is  also   performing  the  duties  of  the
Publication Section.



        PREPARATION AND PUBLICATION OF STANDARD LEGAL DOCUMENTS:

        The  Official Languages Wing of the Legislative Department  is
meant  for  the  translation  of   statutory  material  of  Government
Departments  and  Offices.   However,  the section  3(3)(iii)  of  the
Official  Languages  Act,  1963 requires that both Hindi  and  English
languages  are  to  be used for agreements, contracts  leases,  bonds,
tenders, etc.  In order to facilitate compliance with the requirements
of  the  said  Act, the Official Languages Wing prepares  for  various
Ministries/Departments of the Central Government, the Hindi version of
such  documents, with a view to achieve uniformity in the  translation
of  Standard Legal Documents in use by the Central Government offices,
This  Wing has prepared and published Eight Volumes of the  repeatedly
used  Legal  Documents in diglot form till date.  These  volumes  have
rendered  sufficient assistance in the use of official language Hindi.
These compilations were received well, not only by various Departments
and  Ministries  but  also by the Government  Undertakings  and  State
Governments.

        The  Official Languages Wing also prepares for the  day-to-day
use  of  various  Departments  of the Central  Government,  the  Hindi
version  of such documents.  During the period under report, the Hindi
version  of  1206 pages of Parliament Questions of this  Ministry  and
such documents have been supplied to different Ministries/Departments.


        ESTABLISHING THE INDIAN LANGUAGES IN THE SPHERE OF LAW:

        The Official Languages Wing is constantly doing and/or getting
done  the  work  of translation of Central Acts into Hindi  and  other
languages.   So far as the regional languages are concerned, this work
is  being  done with the cooperation and consent of the various  State
Governments.   Regarding these languages, this work is being done in a
planned way by preparing the list of important Central Acts.

        Apart  from Hindi language, the Official Languages Wing has so
far  published the Constitution of India in thirteen other  languages,
namely,  Assamese,  Bengali,  Gujarati, Kannada,  Malayalam,  Marathi,
Oriya,  Punjabi, Sanaskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu and Sindhi.  More than
one  edition of the most of these versions have been published and  in
case of Marathi, fourth edition was brought out in 1992.

        By  the Constitution ( Seventy-first Amendment ) Act, 1992 the
Konkani,  Manipuri  and  Nepali languages have been  inserted  in  the
Eighth  Schedule to the Constitution of India.  Efforts are being made
to  bring  out  the  Konkani,  Manipuri and  Nepali  versions  of  the
Constitution.

        The  Official Languages Wing also publishes the  authoritative
texts of Central Acts in Regional Languages as envisaged under section
2  of the Authoritative Texts (Central Laws) Act, 1973 ( 50 of 1973 ).
The  progress  of  translation work of the Central  Acts  in  Regional
Languages  during the year under report is reflected in the  following
Table:  -

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
S.No.   Name of the Translation of No.  of Acts Language Acts approved
Authenticated    as    by     O.L.      Wing    Authoritative    Texts
----------------------------------------------------------------------

        1.   Assamese            08      --
        2.   Bengali             --      01
        3.   Gujarati            05      33
        4.   Kannada             11      06
        5.   Malayalam           04      04
        6.   Marathi             09      13
        7.   Oriya               12      --
        8.   Punjabi             --      01
        9.   Tamil               --      41
        10.  Telugu              06      01
        11.  Urdu                13      --
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Total                             68     100
---------------------------------------------------------------------


        WIDE DISTRIBUTION OF CENTRAL ACTS, LEGAL GLOSSARY, ETC.:

        This  year  also the Official Languages Wing has sent  to  all
Hindi  speaking States, Gujarat and Maharashtra as also High Courts in
these States, concerned Ministries/Departments of Government of India,
Andaman  and Nicobar Islands, the Nagari Pracharini Sabha,  Parliament
Library  and  other Libraries, the Gazette copies of Hindi version  of
Central  Acts after they have been authenticated and published in  the
Gazette  of  India.   Copies of the Central Acts in  diglot  form  are
regularly  sent  to all States ( Hindi as well as  non-Hindi  speaking
States),  Supreme  Court  of India, Parliament Library  and  all  High
Courts.

        As  per  requirement,  the copies of the last edition  of  the
Legal  Glossary  have  been  distributed  to  all  officials  of   the
Legislative  Department including the various Ministries, Departments,
Parliament  Library, Courts, Official Languages Commissions/Committees
of the States.  Vidhi Sahitya Prakashan, Government Undertakings, etc.

        WORK RELATING TO THE HINDI SALAHKAR SAMITI:

        In  pursuance of the Legislative Department's Resolution,  the
Government  of India re-constituted the Hindi Salahkar Samiti for  the
Ministry  of Law, Justice and Company Affairs on 18-06-1997.  The  new
Committee  consists of Members from the Lok Sabha and the Members from
the  Rajya Sabha.  Besides, the committee also includes about 19 other
non-official members and invitees.


        The  function of the Samiti is normally to advise the  Central
Government on matters relating to --

        (i)  The translation of Central Acts and Statutory rules  into
Hindi;

        (ii) the evolution of common legal terminology;

        (iii)  the production of the standard law books in Hindi,  for
imparting legal education in Hindi, in Law Colleges and Universities;

        (iv)  the  publication of Law Journals and Reports  in  Hindi;
and

        (v)  the matters ancillary and incidental to any of the  above
items.

        The  last meeting of the newly constituted committee was  held
on 15-09-1997 under the chairmanship of the then Minister of State for
Law, Justice Shri Ramakant D.  Khalap.

        GRANTS-IN-AID TO VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS:

        There is a scheme for the propagation and development of Hindi
and other Indian languages in the field of law, according to which the
voluntary   organisation   and   institutions    are   provided   with
financial-aid.    Since   1985,  the   Official  Languages   Wing   is
implementing  such  scheme  to give financial aid to  those  Voluntary
Organisations  which undertake publication of law books or journals in
Hindi and other Regional Languages.

        With  a view to ensuring the compliance of the  recommendation
of  the Hindi Salahkar Samiti, a high powered Committee for  Financial
Assistance  to  Voluntary Organisations have been constituted  on  3rd
May,  1995.   The  tenure  of the committee expired on  the  2nd  May,
1998.Proposal  for consituting new committee has been submitted and it
is expected, it will be approved soon.


        VIDHI SAHITYA PRAKASHAN:

        16.(i)  In  the  year  1958, the Committee  of  Parliament  on
Official  Languages had recommended that arrangements be made early to
bring  out  authorised  translations  of important  judgments  of  the
Supreme Court and the High Courts and this work ccould be entrusted to
Central  Office  in  Delhi  working   under  the  supervision  of  Law
Department.   Thereafter  on the recommendation of the Hindi  Advisory
Committee,  a Journal Wing was set up in the Ministry of Law & Justice
in  1968 with the objective of promoting the use of Hindi in the legal
field.   This  Wing  was subsequently redesignated as  "VIDHI  SAHITYA
PRAKASHAN"

        Initially, a monthly publication of Supreme Court judgments as
marked  "REPORTABLE"  by  the  Bench  of  the  Court,  delivering  the
judgement concerned commenced in April, 1968 and its was designated as
'Uchchatama   Nyayalaya   Nirnaya   Patrika'.    Another   publication
containing  judgement  of al the High Courts of India was  started  in
January,  1969  and  it was designated as  'Uchcha  Nyayalaya  Nirnaya
Patrika'.   In  1987 Uchcha Nyayalaya Nirnaya Patrika  was  bifurcated
into  two  Patrikas, i.e.  Uchcha Nyayalaya Civil Nirnaya Patrika  and
Uchcha  Nyayalaya Dandik Nirnaya Patrika, Uchchatama Nyayalaya Nirnaya
Patrika  contains  selected reportable judgments of the Supreme  Court
and  the Uchcha Nyayalaya Civil Nirnaya Patrika and Uchcha  Nayayalaya
Dandik  Nirnaya  Patrika  contains  selected judgments  of  civil  and
criminal  cases of all the High Courts respectively.  These are  being
published  monthly  and the number of Royal Octari size of  pages  per
month  on  an  average has been for these Patrikas are  700.   Due  to
phenomenal  increase in the volume of the Reportable Judgements of the
Supreme  Court, the strength of the Hon'ble Supreme Court Judges  rose
from  9  in  1988 to 26 and failure to increase the  strength  of  the
editorial  as  well  as  the other requisite staff  of  the  VSP,  the
Ministry  of  Law,  Justice  and Company Affairs  in  the  Legislative
Department  decided only very very important and scrupulously selected
judgements  of  the  Hon'ble High Court shall be  published.   Digests
based on thse Patrikas are also published from time to time.

        A  quarterly journal entitled Vidhi Sahitya Samachar' is  also
being published which contained detailed information regarding various
activities  in  the  field of law and publications  of  Vidhi  Sahitya
Prakashan.   A  'Publication List' containing priced  publications  of
Vidhi  Sahitya Prakashan is also made available to the customers  from
time to time.

        Apart  from  the publication of the above three Patrikas,  the
Vidhi  Sahitya  Prakashan  is also in charge of the  following  works,
namely:  -

        (a)  Publication  of  Law Text Books in Hindi for use  in  the
academic field and as reference books;

        (b) translation of legal classics in Hindi;

        (c)  awarding  of various prizes for the best publications  in
the field of law;

        (d)  sale of Hindi publications of Vidhi Sahitya Prakashan and
Official  Languages  Wing of the Ministry of Law, Justice and  Company
Affairs in the Legislative Department, and

        (e)  holding  of  conferences,  seminars  and  exhibitions  at
different  important  places in India, particularly in Hindi  speaking
States  for  popularisation  and improvement of  legal  literature  in
Hindi.

        In  addition, Standard law books in Hindi, written by  eminent
authors  are  also being published by the Vidhi Sahitya Prakashan  for
the  use of law students, law teachers, lawyers and judicial officers.
In  order  to give incentive to authors and publishers in the  private
sector, prizes are awarded annually for the best publications in Hindi
in  the field of law.  Seminars in law colleges, District Courts, High
Courts  and  Law  Departments of the State Governments  of  the  Hindi
speaking  States are held for the propagation and development of Hindi
in  the field of law.  Vidhi Sahitya Prakashan also holds  exhibitions
of  its publications of the Official Languages Wing in different Hindi
speaking  States.  It also looks after the sale of its publications as
well  as  the  sale of diglot ( English-Hindi ) Central Acts  and  the
other works Published by Official Languages Wing of the Department.

        The  details  of  achievement  made   during  the  year  under
consideration are set out item-wise in short hereinafter:

        Publication   of  Nirnaya  Patrikas:   --  During   the   year
1998-99,it  was decided that issues of Judgements of Supreme Court  of
India and various High Courts should be prepared on floppies.  The new
system  of computer were installed and Stenographers have been trained
by  National  Informatics  Centre (NIC).  Though it took time  to  get
familiar with the new system, it is now being done regularly.


        During  the  year 1998-99, the Manuscript of the 35 issues  of
Uchchatama  Nyayalaya  Nirnaya Patrika are under print and one  floppy
for January, 1998 issue Uchchatama Nyayalaya Nirnaya Patrika have been
sent  to  Press.   Various issues of Uchcha Nyayalaya  Dandik  Nirnaya
Patrika  since  1993  to 1996 are in various stages  of  printing.   A
floppy  for  November, 1996 issue have been prepared and sent  to  the
press  for  printing.  Similarly, various issues of  Uchcha  Nyayalaya
Civil Nirnaya Patrika from July, 1993 to December, 1993, October, 1994
to  December,  1994 and January, 1995 to December, 1996 are  lying  in
various  stages of printing.  Floppies of the issues of February, 1997
to May, 1997 have been prepared and sent to the Press for printing.

        INDICES  :   All  the  four quarterly  indices  of  Uchchatama
Nyayalaya Nirnaya Patrika for the year 1994 have been published Part I
of  the Uchcha Nyayalaya Dandik Nirnaya Patrika for the year 1993 have
been published and Part I (Half-Yearly) Uchcha Nyayalaya Civil Nirnaya
Patrika for the year 1993 have been published.


        Subscribers of the Patrikas for 1997-98:  -

        During the year under review, the number of the subscribers of
the Patrikas was as under:-


--------------------------------------------------------------------
Name  of the Patrika                     No.  of Subscribers
---------------------------------------------------------------------

        Uchchatama Nyayalaya Nirnaya Patrika     776

        Uchcha Nyayalaya Civil Nirnaya Patrika   776

        Uchcha Nyayalaya Dandik Nirnaya Patrika  776

        Vidhi Sahitya Samachar                    95

        ---------------------------------------------------------------------

        Digest:   --  Five  years' ( 1988-92 )  Digest  of  Uchchatama
Nyayalaya  Nirnaya  Patrika, three years' (1990-92) Digest  of  Uchcha
Nyayalaya  Dandik Nirnaya Patrika and three years' Digest (1990-92) of
Uchcha  Nyayalaya  Civil Nirnaya Patrika have been printed  and  their
price is yet to be fixed by the Ministry.

        AWARD  OF PRIZES :  The Evaluation Committee for the award  of
prizes  under  the Scheme has been reconstituted w.e.f.  26th  August,
1997  and during the year 1998-99, awards for the year 1995, 1996  and
1997  have  been decided.  Besides, an author to write Hindi  Book  on
Jurisprudence  have been recommended.  Hindu Vidhi Ke Siddhant, a book
published  by  the  Ministry have been adjudged the best book  of  the
decade  (1983-92).  Awards for the books have been increased from  Rs.
10,000/-  to  Rs.  25,000/-.  Similarly, awards for the  Hindi  books,
received from the private sector have been increased.


        Books:   --  So far 29 Standard Law Books in Hindi  have  been
published.   Print  Order  for other books namely  'Adhunik  Parivarik
Vidhi'  and  Bhartiya  Dand Sanhita have been given for  printing  and
revised and enlarged editions of four books namely Shram Vidhi (Labour
Laws),  Vidhik  Upchar (Legal Remedies), Hindu Vidhi (Hindu  Law)  and
Chikitsa  Nyayashastra  aur  Vish-Vigyan  (Medical  Jurisprudence  and
Taxocology)  are  in the final stages of printing.  The third  revised
editions  of "Prashasnik Vidhi" and "Sampatti Antaran Adhiniyam"  have
been  edited  and  is  being sent to press for  printing.   The  third
revised  editions of Dand Prakriya Sanhita and Bhagidari Adhiniyam are
being prepared.

                            ..........

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